Feed Limmy’s 40 Songs of 2016

In keeping with this annual tradition that stretches back to a land before Snapchat and Gigi Hadid, I am here to present you Feed Limmy’s Songs of The Year.

Over the years it has become more of a documentation of songs released in the past 12 months that I have really enjoyed or have soundtracked a special memory. I think for that reason, these lists of the more intimate nature perhaps carry a bit more meaning and weight, as they’re not critically-inclined but are measured by the standard of one’s enjoyment and personal connection. Which after all, is what music is all about.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Various Artists “Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1” Soundtrack

Lorde is probably one of the most in-demand and untouchable young talents in the music industry right now. The 18-year old alternative-pop savant from New Zealand has been given the honour of curating the new Hunger Games soundtrack and boy, did she turn it the hell out.

Hunger Games soundtrack Lorde

Mockingjay Part 1 is the third soundtrack of the popular anthology and is, quite rightly so, the most hyped one yet. Just like the movie, you get a sense that each artist selected for the soundtrack needs to breathe some level of cool, youthful rebellion. Lorde herself would fit the bill quite well but this isn’t a Lorde album in disguise, per se.

Sonically, the album is a cohesive and magnetic mix of hip hop and alternative electro pop. The album opener ‘Meltdown’ is probably the best summary of the different influences at play here. Belgian producer Stromae cuts a mean, strutting electro beat while Q-Tip and Pusha T throw punchy rap verses and Lorde owns the hook with HAIM on backing vocals.

As well as securing in-demand figures in the industry like Kanye West, Charli XCX and others for the project, Lorde has also submitted a new track ‘Yellow Flicker Beat’, produced by Paul Epworth who was behind Adele‘s monumental album 21, and a spine-tingling cover of Bright Eyes‘ ‘Ladder Song’.

Continue reading

Ariana Grande “My Everything”

Pop Bambi, Ariana Grande, has officially made the leap from Nickelodeon star to proper contender in the youth music market, all in just the space of 17 months.

ariana grande my everything

My Everything, her second album, is easily one of the most anticipated releases in any teen pop diary this year. Bolstered by the global success of ‘Problem‘ (featuring Iggy Azalea), her first UK chart-topper, My Everything has been hyped up to be the album that will introduce Ariana to a bigger audience.

The 21-year old singer has been tirelessly hailed as the new generation’s Mariah Carey (probably much to the chagrin of the Elusive Chanteuse herself). It’s something of a badge of honour Ariana wears and flashes with pride every time she ad-libs in the whistle register. The comparisons also stick because of Grande’s penchant for cutting slickly-produced saccharine R&B ballads which has, until now, limited her appeal to mainstream music fans on this side of the Atlantic.

She’s a young female pop performer with a naturally-occurring gay male following but unlike Lady Gaga, Katy Perry or Britney Spears, Little Miss Grande has yet to give us a proper anthem we can really get behind. You know just the kind we’re talking about: a huge dance track with emotional lyrics and bonafide diva vocals. Well, that all changed when ‘Break Free’ went online.

The new single, featuring German-Russian EDM producer Zedd, is a brazen, club stomper with an emancipatory feel. It’s a straightforward survivor anthem for the brokenhearted and fed-up, much in the spirit of Britney Spears‘ ‘Stronger’, Cher‘s ‘Strong Enough’ and Gloria Gaynor‘s ‘I Will Survive’. Ariana digs her heels in and sings, “This is the part when I say I don’t want it! I’m stronger than I’ve been before. This is the part when I break free, ’cause I can’t resist it no more!”.

 

As enjoyable as it was, ‘Break Free’ sadly isn’t a fair representation of the album’s soundscape. For the most part, Ariana remains quietly devoted to the vanilla R&B balladry set out in her first album. Having said that, there is a convincing coming-of-age confidence and feistiness in My Everything that urges its listeners to stick with it for a bit longer.

Continue reading